Art classes, Japan, Kids, repair, Textiles, upcycling, workshops

New Workshops for Kids

I just wanted to let you all know about my upcoming kids’ school holiday workshops. Book your crafty, stitch-crazy kids in for some imaginative and skill-building creative time!

STITCHDRAWING: 10-4, Friday 29th September or Friday 6th October, Ku-ring-Gai Art Centre

IMG_5200

IMG_5202

This is a new workshop that will build manual and imaginative skills. Here’s what we’ll be up to:

Share in an imaginative day of stitch drawing: making marks and drawing on cloth. We’ll use some basic hand stitches with different thread to create texture, line and pattern. Use your wild imagination to make an experimental abstract or figurative picture. Take home your own original cloth drawing.

Book here

JAPANESE BORO CUSHION WORKSHOP: 10-4, Thursday 5th October, Workshop Arts Centre

538cffc9-d27e-4db4-9eb5-578ba73cff63

This is a really fun workshop. Like collage with stitching. And the kids will get lots of recycling ideas!

Ideal for ages 8+ years. Spend a day making hand sewn Japanese boro style cushions! We’ll use reclaimed Japanese fabrics, denim and reused cloth to stitch our creations. Cost includes all materials.

Book here

I’m always developing workshop ideas, so if you’re interested in other workshops or have ideas of what you’d like to learn, please get in touch.

Advertisements
Standard
Art classes, Japan, repair, Textiles, upcycling, workshops

Workshop wonders

IMG_5700I gave a one-day Japanese Boro Bag Workshop to some really delightful and enthusiastic kids this week at Ku-ring-gai Art Centre.

I was amazed at how quickly some of the kids grasped the concept as well as handling needle and thread.

One little grade three girl did the neatest backstitch for the seams (have a look below)!

fullsizeoutput_cf5

fullsizeoutput_cf4We used denim from old jeans, calico, old Japanese indigo-dyed cotton, an old indigo-stencilled yukata and a few other bits and pieces, and stitched with linen thread, sashiko thread and fine string.

They were very receptive to the idea of using old clothes in this way, and we talked about the aesthetic appeal of combining these fabrics with a limited palette and varying patterns and textures.

IMG_5835

fullsizeoutput_cfaI pre-sewed the bag linings to save time, and sensibly, brought the sewing machine so I could hurry things up towards the end of the day, but the kids were keen to hand sew the side seams.

I’ll think I’ll need to make the workshop a two-day one next time.

fullsizeoutput_cf6The results were just beautiful!

And the kids learned so much too.

Always a bonus!

Standard
Experiments, Paper, repair, Studio practice, Textiles

Studio work: chaos, conflict, and the path to resolution

IMG_4850.jpg

I’ve been spending time in the studio working on some paper pieces – with cloth and text   too, of course – reflecting on chaos, conflict and resolution.

It seems to be part of an evolving theme I’m exploring about my dad. Always having thought of him as a fairly difficult man, with moments of intense love and attachment, I have for many years thought about examining his relationship with his family and his love of the Papua New Guinean people – his comrades during World War II.

Dad trained members of PNG police force during the war, and recorded, in Pidgin English, testimonies of the native people affected by Japanese war crimes after its end. You’ll see some of his handwritten and typed records in these photos.

Rather than embarking on a comprehensive analysis of his life, I’m finding myself drawn to examining bits, vignettes if you like, that catch in my memory. And the more I do this the more I see parallels with contemporary life, and sometimes specifically with my own.

In the contemporary world Japan is a major trading partner and friend of Australia; a remarkable contrast between Dad’s memories and mine. I love the Japanese, their culture, art practices and traditions. And the contrasts between the WWII era and now are both strikingly different and proof of the possibilities of reconciliation.

Having dug up some lovely vellum I bought in New York twenty years ago (in my painting days – and I’d always thought it too beautiful to use), I’m combining it with a variety of rice papers and vintage threads.

A selection of stitches that have their own particular meanings in this context: a ‘mattress’ surgical stitch, running/sashiko, and the stitch method used to repair Japanese sake bags (I don’t know if it has a name, but please let me know if you do) are really important to the work.

IMG_4853.jpg

Vintage Japanese rice paper from notebooks and ledgers.

IMG_4854

Burnt Arches paper, surgical stitching in vintage linen thread, handwritten text.

IMG_4852.jpg

Placement of layers of hand dyed muslin, like bandages, over the work, ready for stitching.

An attempt at mending.

I’m hoping to get at least one piece completed this week, so will show you the results in due course…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Standard
Artists, Inspiration, repair, Studio practice, Textiles, Uncategorized, upcycling

The heirloom theory

sat-brown-rabbit-web.jpg

Donya Coward, Brown sitting Rabbit – photograph from her website

Do you have any artists or makers who do it for you? Are they an inspiration for your principles and practice?

I often find research addictive. One find leads to another. Before you know it you’ve got a chain of inspiration and empathic appreciation for the work of others that informs your own work and sits comfortably with your beliefs and principles.

Discarded materials, ratty old preloved garments, mending, and disparate bits & pieces often have reuse potential that goes unheeded. Memory is embedded into everything. These examples of creative work are very much aligned with my own philosophy and love of materials.

Slow work.

Hand work.

Considered.

Ethical.

I say that (ethical) because I firmly believe in the Less Is More theory.

Less consumption, more human contact, less fast-paced living. Purchase something of great quality that you love, that will last and last – and take pleasure in handing it on to others when the time comes.

Donya Coward is an artist whose work is an exquisite example of what I like to call ‘the heirloom theory’. She takes bits and pieces of very different materials and turns them into sculptures and other textile art that are brilliantly handworked treasures. You can see more of her incredibly detailed work here.

cp_cp001_0141-682x1024

Celia Pym, Norwegian Sweater – photograph from her website

cp_cp001_006

Celia Pym, Hope’s Sweater, 1951 – photograph from her website

Celia Pym is a UK artist whose penchant for darning and mending is a quirky and beautiful way of extending the life of garments and objects. In her hands anything textile can be preserved in a way that gives a refreshing and individual twist to its existence. You can see more of Celia’s unique projects here.

5

Mayer Peace Collection – image from Instagram

f881fc3418cf46c948049c9d82121854

Mayer Peace Collection – image from Instagram

Berlin designer Christine Mayer’s practice is one I’ve watched for a while. She is superbly skilled at repurposing textiles in a way that’s individual and deftly structured. Her work extends to theatre costumes as well as fashion. Check out her work here. I’m happy to say I’m a proud owner of one of Christine’s pieces, bought during trip to Berlin in 2012. Timeless and beautiful.

I love finding inspiration in the efforts of like-minded creatives. There is satisfaction in finding similarities in practice, using your own resources creatively, and sharing ideas, whatever limitations might be in place.

Who are the practitioners you find inspiring? Does your list keep growing? Let’s compare notes……

Standard