Art classes, Japan, Kids, repair, Textiles, upcycling, workshops

New Workshops for Kids

I just wanted to let you all know about my upcoming kids’ school holiday workshops. Book your crafty, stitch-crazy kids in for some imaginative and skill-building creative time!

STITCHDRAWING: 10-4, Friday 29th September or Friday 6th October, Ku-ring-Gai Art Centre

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This is a new workshop that will build manual and imaginative skills. Here’s what we’ll be up to:

Share in an imaginative day of stitch drawing: making marks and drawing on cloth. We’ll use some basic hand stitches with different thread to create texture, line and pattern. Use your wild imagination to make an experimental abstract or figurative picture. Take home your own original cloth drawing.

Book here

JAPANESE BORO CUSHION WORKSHOP: 10-4, Thursday 5th October, Workshop Arts Centre

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This is a really fun workshop. Like collage with stitching. And the kids will get lots of recycling ideas!

Ideal for ages 8+ years. Spend a day making hand sewn Japanese boro style cushions! We’ll use reclaimed Japanese fabrics, denim and reused cloth to stitch our creations. Cost includes all materials.

Book here

I’m always developing workshop ideas, so if you’re interested in other workshops or have ideas of what you’d like to learn, please get in touch.

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Art classes, Japan, repair, Textiles, upcycling, workshops

Workshop wonders

IMG_5700I gave a one-day Japanese Boro Bag Workshop to some really delightful and enthusiastic kids this week at Ku-ring-gai Art Centre.

I was amazed at how quickly some of the kids grasped the concept as well as handling needle and thread.

One little grade three girl did the neatest backstitch for the seams (have a look below)!

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fullsizeoutput_cf4We used denim from old jeans, calico, old Japanese indigo-dyed cotton, an old indigo-stencilled yukata and a few other bits and pieces, and stitched with linen thread, sashiko thread and fine string.

They were very receptive to the idea of using old clothes in this way, and we talked about the aesthetic appeal of combining these fabrics with a limited palette and varying patterns and textures.

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fullsizeoutput_cfaI pre-sewed the bag linings to save time, and sensibly, brought the sewing machine so I could hurry things up towards the end of the day, but the kids were keen to hand sew the side seams.

I’ll think I’ll need to make the workshop a two-day one next time.

fullsizeoutput_cf6The results were just beautiful!

And the kids learned so much too.

Always a bonus!

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Inspiration, Japan, Residencies, workshops

Investigating pigment, process and imperfection: authentic Japanese textile methods (Part 1)

 

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I’ve been very fortunate to receive two artist grants (from the Australia Council for the Arts and the Copyright Council Creative Individuals Career Fund) to learn about indigo shibori and other Japanese textilial processes with Japanese Textile Workshops in the mountain village of Fujino in Japan last month.

Living in a charming 150 year old traditional silkworm-farmhouse/barn I stitched and dyed from early morning until late at night for most of the ten days of instruction by Bryan Whitehead, with eight fabulously interesting women from France, Germany, the Netherlands, Chile, Brazil, Canada and the US. An intensive crash-course in shibori techniques was interspersed with intervals of silk cocoon processing, spinning, cord weaving, stencil dyeing, resist-paste making, artisan studio visiting, and antique textile examining, and, as if that’s not enough, we were treated to wonderful Japanese (and occasionally not-so-Japanese) meals cooked by the multi-talented ikebana expert, Hiro.

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Bryan prepping the indigo vat.

Stitching and folding for shibori is so very time consuming! There were a few blisters and wounds to contend with (from stitching, but mostly from pulling the threads), but the results made up for all that pain. It was a joy working with like-minded people, learning while reinforcing the value of time and care in making something (and believe me, time is necessary) – and laughing a lot while getting to know people.

Indigio samples

Various shibori manipulation techniques, and the first products.

I loved the pole wrapping technique (shown above). It takes nearly forever and is, like the others, so worth it! I especially love the watercoloury bleeds of the indigo, and the not-quite-controllability of the whole process.

Finished work 2

Finished work 1

A selection of my finished work.

The techniques I learned have given me lots of ideas for making work. I’ll be showing works in progress as they develop and would love your feedback, but in the meantime look out for a couple of other upcoming posts on other techniques from the workshop.

Lunch

Not forgetting lunch! Always served with an awesome salad from the vegetable garden outside the kitchen window, with beautiful locally sourced pottery.

 

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body

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I’d also like to acknowledge the assistance of the Copyright Agency Creative Individuals Career Fund for this project

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Exhibitions, Inspiration, Japan, Residencies, workshops

Images, memory and boro love

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How do you feel about the power of images? Do you ever stop and think about the impact images have had on your life? They’ve always been hugely influential to me, and I can think of many I’ve carried around in my head since early childhood.

A more recent episode that illustrates this is my fascination with Japanese antique boro textiles and clothing. A few years ago I came across my first boro images (yep, on the internet) and was captivated by their layering, frayed and tangled edges, faded surfaces, and their quirky and sometimes desperate stitching. But what I think screamed out to me the most was the obvious extent to which these items were valued by their makers and their families – out of desperate poverty I might add, but the Japanese have a way with aesthetics that can make your head spin.

While my art practice began with (mostly oil) painting, my recent work involves photography, textiles and installation. I found the sentiment of these boro textiles very sympathetic to the intentions in my own work. Memory, a sense of place, traces of human touch and history now all interconnect with varying input from photographs, cloth and stitch.

All this led me to undertake an artist residency in Japan last month, where I saw authentic boro that didn’t disappoint. More on my residency next week. But in the meantime here are some photographs I took at Amuse Museum in Asakusa, Tokyo that show some exquisite textiles and clothing. Here is the museum’s website. And if you’d like to see more I can recommend Sri Threads beautiful website as well. I wonder if they touch your sensibilities too?

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This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body

aca_logo_horizontal_small_rgb-543223f8c880e

 

I’d also like to acknowledge the assistance of the Copyright Agency Creative Individuals Career Fund for this project

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